Alise Post

  
  


Alise Post

Birthdate: January 17, 1991
Height: 5'2"/1.6m
Weight: 123 lbs./56 kg./8.8 st.
Place of Birth: St. Cloud, Minnesota
Hometown: St. Cloud, Minnesota
Residence: Chula Vista, California
Education: University of San Diego
Teams: Redline Bicycles
Website: redlinebicycles.com/team/alise-post/
Social Media: Facebook

Olympic and World Championship Results

USA Cycling National Championships

Career Highlights

Points of Interest

  • Alise cites her boyfriend, Australian BMX superstar Sam Willoughby, as one of the most influential individuals on her career.
  • Alise was also a highly competitive gymnast in her 'younger days.'
  • In 2006 she was voted "Rookie Pro of the Year" by the readers of BMXer Magazine. Up until this point, this honor had been exclusively reserved for males.

Personal

Despite being one of the best female BMX racers in the U.S. back in 2008, Alise Post was denied a spot on the Olympic team because, at age 17, she was too young. The age minimum for an Olympic BMX racer in 2008 was 19. In a sport that awards national titles to champions as young as five, a racer's rise to fame comes early, and the young BMX star from St. Cloud, Minn., who was accustomed to racing at the sport's top level, was forced to witness BMX's pinnacle event from afar. To distract herself from the disappointment, Alise spread herself thin across three sports: BMX, gymnastics, and track and field, while maintaining a 4.0 grade average. The Herculean efforts demanded by her activities took a toll and her 2008-09 BMX racing seasons suffered as a result.

Throughout those years, Alise had a bit of a reality check. Injury and fresh competition brought new challenges to her. Despite her below-par performances on the international level, by the end of 2009 she was back among the world's best. Once she became eligible for the 2012 Olympic Games, Alise took her dedication to BMX to a new level. Upon graduating high school in 2009, Alise retired from gymnastics and track and field in order to relocate — at the invitation of USA Cycling — to the Olympic Training Center in Chula Vista, Calif., and regain her winning ways. Although she remained busy by continuing her education as a fulltime student at the University of San Diego for the 2009-10 academic year and by increasing her involvement on the BMX World Cup circuit, she saw big improvements in the beginning of 2010. As a result, she resolved to narrow her focus yet again by making the difficult decision to take a break from college and completely dedicate herself to BMX.

Within months of this decision, Alise claimed a place as the top-ranked American, both nationally and internationally, by taking third place at both her first elite world championship, and at a world cup race on her home track in Chula Vista. She followed up those results with a fourth place at the final world cup round in France and by finishing second overall in the world rankings.

Alise's brilliant performances ended with a crash in practice just days prior to the 2011 UCI BMX World Championships. Her years as a gymnast and track and field athlete left her with overstretched ligaments, which tore on impact and left her right fibula exposed to breakage. She was poised for a strong finish to the 2011 season and as she put it, "It’s crazy…a year’s worth of work and “BAM!,” gone in the blink of an eye."

A true competitor, the 5'2", 120 lb. Post began immediate rehab following surgery and was back on her bike in time to successfully defend her USA Cycling national championship title in the spring of 2012 and hasn't slowed since.

Hear more from Alise in our series Profiling the Future of American Cycling.



Related Articles


Volkswagen
Sierra NevadaUSACDFShimanoBonk BreakerSpy
UCI USA Cycling is the official governing body for all disciplines of competitive cycling in the United States. The 501c3, membership-based organization aims both to achieve sustained success in international cycling competition and to grow competitive cycling in America while delivering an exceptional customer experience.
View Children's Online Privacy Protection Policy
US Olympic Committee